Susan Solano

RochesterCremation heart-closed (2)

Rochester:  July 13, 2014 at age 59.  Susan is survived by her mother, Kathleen Wander and other loving family and friends.

Services and interment held privately.

Rochester Cremation, 4044 W. Henrietta Road, Rochester NY 14623, 359-2300, RochesterCremation.com

7 Condolences

  1. Barbara Ferrell on July 27, 2014 at 2:22 pm

    Mother Bee,

    We will always remember you in a special way. I thank God for your precious love and wisdom. We needed you, but God needed you more. His love is everlasting and we know that you are in good hands. I wish heaven had a phone, so that we could talk more often. Rest in peace (RIP)!

    Barry, Barbara and Sherita Ferrell

  2. Jood on November 23, 2014 at 5:02 pm

    I am deeply saendded by the news of Stuart’s passing. We were friends through Sequoyah, Tyson, and West. No one could expect to meet a kinder, more intelligent, sincere, talented, or good-natured person than Stuart. My thoughts and prayers go to Paige and Bob at this difficult time. John Innes

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  7. Chika on May 3, 2015 at 9:10 pm

    What are we doing here? Allow me to sum up my opinion REALLY brfleiy, as this too could take a fairly fat volume…We have HUGE divide between the folks who really have the content knowledge to drive the curriculum (higher ed.) and the (should be) pedagogical experts in our K-12 educational institutions.That needs a word or two more: one could argue that higher ed. is a collection of research institutions with their eye on publishing academic works in dusty old journals… not on teaching & learning. However, my experience was different. The gentlemen I learned science from at the undergrad level were deeply knowledgeable, but more importantly passionate about teaching. Luckily for me, they were naturals at this, for very little training is given to those at that level. So, I have seen higher ed. work so well. Those gentlemen… who have their eye not only on fostering cutting research (but with undergrad students) but also teaching their own classes and inspiring subsequent waves of future teachers.Hell- I ran into Dr. Ashley (a parasitologist and model biology instructor) in the video store just last night (where I got “Burn After Reading” -funny stuff) and I walked out of the store -planning more projects than I already have- on the way to my cold, blue car.The flipside is… we hire near idiots to control state level curriculum. Let this statement be preserved on the web. Our current curriculum director for science (K-12 mind you) was an elementary teacher. Our previous was a 7th-grade Earth science teacher.I am a generalist instructional coach in a high school. My focus as of the past three years has been pedagogical polishing across all content areas. Apparently- I was hand picked for this job because of a predisposition toward pedagogical skill and a drive toward excellence. That really isn’t a un-purposefully cocky statement.Allow me to be the person to state here that instructional strategies cannot fix the system at a higher level. Being a “good teacher” does not qualify one for conceiving, writing, disseminating, and managing the implementation of a comprehensive high school science curriculum. So how do we fix that? I can tell you how we make an attempt in my state… we “involve” expert teachers. Mmmmm hmmmm. I have been involved as a “content expert” in several stages of the creation of our high-stakes state exam at the high school level. It sucks. Seldom have I been so disenfranchised as when I have had to spend four days locked in a room with 9 to 11 other “content experts” wishing… praying… I had a member of higher ed. int he room with me to help drown out loud voices drenched with scientific misconception. *Sigh.*So yeah- “Missouri teachers have a voice in our own exam.” Uh huh. let me say in writing how bad of an idea this really can be. I would love to give you examples. I could give colorful examples that would make the readers of this blog giggle and feel good inside you aren’t in the Show-Me state. However, (and I am being very serious here) I cannot do that. I have sworn in writing that I will not give specific examples of the items on these exams, nor the discussions/debate surrounding those items.How CIA is that? I even got a letter in the mail a week after each even *reminding* me of my commitment. See what I mean?See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil. So I ask… how can any true oversight of such a sick process be done if only students subjected to the test… or silent (and often underqualified) teachers?*I started this comment around 1:00pm… but with diapers, bottles, etc… I have lost my train of thought. Sorry. But I will post trusting that my pediatrician pal understands.;-)Sean

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